Perllan Treftadaeth Creigiau Heritage Orchard


A collection of 12 rare Welsh fruit trees planted in 2021

Casgliad o 12 goed ffrwythau prin a blannwyd yn 2021.


This orchard was planted at the depth of the Covid pandemic in 2021 to bring the promise of a brighter future. The trees were kindly donated by Natural Resources Wales.

Details of select varieties are set out below.

Please enjoy the orchard


Marged Nicholas

Versatile apple from Carmathen

also good for cider

Dessert/Culinary

Tree location 2


Pig Aderyn

(Bird's beak)

Early Eater and Cider apple from Norman Era

Originated in St. Dogmaels

Juicy green and scarlet stripes with a cider-like tang

Tree location 3

Denbigh Plum

Dessert & Culinary plum dating back to the 18th century

Excellent when eaten warm and straight from the tree. It is also good for cooking and jam making.

Denbigh Plum has PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) Status

Pick and use in mid-September.

Tree Location 6 & 12


Gwell na mill

(seek no further)

Apple 17th century from Monmouth

Nutty and aromatic. Medicinal.

Keeps its shape when cooked. Makes a single variety cider.

Mid season triple purpose

Tree location 4


Pig y golomen

Apple dating from pre 1900 from Pembroke.

Bright green round cooker

Mid season cooker

Tree location 7

Cariad Cherry

Eating cherry from Caernarfon

Highly attractive heart-shaped cherry, rich red and sweet.

Tree location 1 & 9




Nant Gwrtheryn (Pen Llyn)

Nant Gwrtheyrn on the Pen Llyn in North Wales was an isolated quarry community accessible only by the sea.

A delightful golden russet eating apple with a fascinating fennel flavour

Pick in October, use October to December.

Tree location 5

Monmouth Beauty

Apple from Malpas

dated 18th century

A heavy cropping early eater.

Tree location 8



Bardsey Island

Apple found on Bardsey Island, Probably planted in the 1870s, was discovered near the remains of a 13th century abbey.

The apples have a lemon aroma, and will keep until November.

Tree location 11


Glan Sevin


Originating from Llangadog, a once popular mid-season eating apple.

The fruit is sweet and refreshing. Cropping is heavy and reliable. The handsome, large fruit have a crumbly yet juicy, fine-flavoured texture. At its best in early November.

Tree location 10

Find us

Find us on the Orchard Network - a partnership of organisations working together for the conservation of orchards across the British Isles

Contact for more information